The Resource Comrades or competition? : union relations with Aboriginal workers in the South Australian and Northern Territory pastoral industries, 1878-1957, (electronic resource)

Comrades or competition? : union relations with Aboriginal workers in the South Australian and Northern Territory pastoral industries, 1878-1957, (electronic resource)

Label
Comrades or competition? : union relations with Aboriginal workers in the South Australian and Northern Territory pastoral industries, 1878-1957
Title
Comrades or competition?
Title remainder
union relations with Aboriginal workers in the South Australian and Northern Territory pastoral industries, 1878-1957
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
"This thesis seeks to understand the historical factors that contributed to Aboriginal workers being included in pastoral industry unions as comrades, or treated as competitors with 'white' unionists for jobs and income. It explores the changing characteristics and nature of Australian Workers Union (AWU) and North Australian Workers Union (NAWU) relations with Aboriginal workers, and internal union and external factors affecting these relations. It challenges long held views that unions excluded Aboriginal workers simply because of the racism of 'white' members and automatically included them when there was a union leadership commitment to class solidarity regardless of 'race'. The study focuses on union relations with workers in the South Australian and Northern Territory pastoral industries; industries with long histories of Aboriginal employment and unionism. The extension of the investigation over two regions enables a comparative analysis of two distinct unions with a combined coverage of both the wool and cattle sectors. The federated branch structure of the AWU and the Territory base of the NAWU, operating across state, federal and Territory jurisdictions, allow the thesis to examine the effects of diverse union and external regulatory regimes. The thesis systematically investigates the impacts on relations of internal union factors including geographical location, size, available resources, leadership, contending ideologies and discourses, and place within the larger union movement. The effects of external factors are similarly considered. The contrasting political economies of the wool and cattle sectors of the pastoral industry are examined, as are factors including employer policy and tactics; state, Territory and Commonwealth laws relating to Aboriginal peoples; industrial and Constitutional law and government policies. The analysis of AWU and NAWU relations with Aboriginal workers is pursued across differing phases and arenas of union activity. It commences at union formation and the development of union membership eligibility Rules, includes periods of war and depression, and concludes with the communist and anti-communist politics of the 1950s. Processes of wages and conditions determination, government lobbying and campaigning, form a major part of this study. The historical period covered by the thesis ends in the mid-1950s, which marks the virtual cessation of union initiatives to improve the wages and conditions of Aboriginal pastoral industry workers in South Australia and the Northern Territory until claims for their award inclusion in 1964 and 1965 respectively. This investigation is not limited to the larger picture of exclusion or solidarity. The thesis also analyses gradual shifts in relations and shows how apparently small-scale contexts fostered positive relations or undermined them. It considers how these unions operated on a day-to-day basis, and how and why they prioritised issues of importance to Aboriginal workers off or onto their industrial agenda. It examines not only what these unions did, but also what they did not do, and why. The thesis finds that the AWU and NAWU adopted very different 'race' provisions in their Rules affecting the membership eligibility of Aboriginal workers. It also finds that they assumed contrasting policy positions relating to Aboriginal employment during periods of economic depression and unemployment. Union claims and argument for the award coverage of Aboriginal workers are shown to vary in intent within and between the AWU and NAWU at particular times and under particular internal and external historical contexts. It finds that simple internal dichotomies such as left/right ideology or union militancy/conservatism cannot fully explain these differing relations. AWU and NAWU relations with Aboriginal workers are found to be complex and dynamic arrangements of internal union views and actions that shift in conjunction with disparate enabling or constraining
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Elton, Judith
Dissertation note
Thesis submitted for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy, School of Communication, Division of Education, Arts and Social Sciences, University of South Australia 2007
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Aboriginal Australians
  • Aboriginal Australians
  • Australian Workers' Union
  • Australian Workers' Union
  • North Australian Workers' Union
  • North Australian Workers' Union
  • Labor unions
  • Labor unions and communism
  • Labor unions
  • Labor unions
  • Labor unions
  • Labor union rules
Label
Comrades or competition? : union relations with Aboriginal workers in the South Australian and Northern Territory pastoral industries, 1878-1957, (electronic resource)
Link
http://search.ror.unisa.edu.au/media/researcharchive/open/9915952052901831/53111928030001831
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Title from electronic document (viewed 3/8/10)
Contents
Pastoral industry sectors & employment; Union formation, rules & 'race'; The AWU & the pastoral industry award - the award coverage of Aboriginal workers 1907-1917; The AWU & the pastoral industry award - the erosion of coverage & attempts to regain it 1926-1956; The NAWU & the determination of cattle industry wages & conditions - award consolidation 1915-1928; The NAWU & the determination of cattle industry wages & conditions - ordinance reviews 1928-1931; The NAWU & the determination of cattle industry wages & conditions - reactions to communist politics 1931-1940; The NAWU & the determination of cattle industry wages & conditions - left/communist solidarity & anti-communism 1940-1957
System details
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Type of computer file
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Label
Comrades or competition? : union relations with Aboriginal workers in the South Australian and Northern Territory pastoral industries, 1878-1957, (electronic resource)
Link
http://search.ror.unisa.edu.au/media/researcharchive/open/9915952052901831/53111928030001831
Publication
Note
Title from electronic document (viewed 3/8/10)
Contents
Pastoral industry sectors & employment; Union formation, rules & 'race'; The AWU & the pastoral industry award - the award coverage of Aboriginal workers 1907-1917; The AWU & the pastoral industry award - the erosion of coverage & attempts to regain it 1926-1956; The NAWU & the determination of cattle industry wages & conditions - award consolidation 1915-1928; The NAWU & the determination of cattle industry wages & conditions - ordinance reviews 1928-1931; The NAWU & the determination of cattle industry wages & conditions - reactions to communist politics 1931-1940; The NAWU & the determination of cattle industry wages & conditions - left/communist solidarity & anti-communism 1940-1957
System details
System requirements: reader required to view pdf document
Type of computer file
Text

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